Woman Tone

Let’s take another quick look at one of the ultimate classic guitar tones, a sound Eric Clapton once described as “Woman Tone.” We’ll spare you the history of the band, but if you’re not aware, do yourself of favor and look them up. Better yet, get yourself acquainted with their music.

As part of their farewell concert, Clapton gave an interview where he described exactly how to get this sound. In his own words, either “by using the bass pickup, or the lead pickup but with all the bass off…on the tone control. Turn it down to one or ‘oh.'” Watch and learn from the man himself.

If you’re lucky enough to have an SG, Epiphone or otherwise, that will help. But a Strat can certainly come close when using the same pickup strategy. The elements are simple enough, we’ve lined up the perfect combination in AmpStamp.

SUNSHINE

For the rhythm tone, set the amp to direct output, bypassing the cabinet altogether. It’s likely this was done with the amp or a pedal, but you’ll instantly hear the clarity and top end that Clapton gets from his guitar. For the lead tone, use the neck pickup, or the bridge pickup with the tone down to zero, or to taste. You can’t miss this epic sound. Enjoy!

  • VG402B Amplifier set to use the Normal channel
  • VG 4x12A 100W ’67 Cabinet
  •  WH100 Wah
  •  AMB400 Plate Reverb

Killer Queen

Import Preset: Killer QueenImport Preset: Killer Queen

Let’s take a quick look at one of the ultimate classic guitar tones, the one and only Brian May of Queen. We’ll spare you the history of the band, but if you’re not aware, do yourself of favor and look them up. Better yet, get yourself acquainted with their music.

In a rare moment for this business, Brian actually cut a near 30 minute video back in 1983 detailing how he achieved his now legendary sound. If you have the time, we highly recommend watching it.

Here are a few key points that we gleaned from watching the master at work:

  • uses AC30’s without Top Boost, can achieve a similar tone by playing through the Normal channel
  • starts with a really woolly tone and refines it using a Dallas Rangemaster Treble Booster
  • plays with a metal pick
  • adds a chorus pedal using two or more amplifiers for true stereo operation
  • also adds a delay pedal panning repeats to opposite amplifiers

Oh right, and Brian’s guitar is obviously a one-of-a-kind! But that’s OK. We’ve lined up a few of the required elements in AmpStamp:

  • VG302E Amplifier set to use the Normal channel
  • EQ100 Treble Boost
  • VG 4x12B 100W ’73 Cabinet for rhythm tones
  • VG 2x12C 30W ’67 Cabinet for lead tones
Killer Queen

Disable the boost for mellow cleans, tap into solo mode for blistering leads, and enable echo to bring in other-worldly harmonies while soloing. This preset has you covered for all occasions. We’ve also added room ambience to capture the studio sound found on recordings of rock bands during the mid-’70’s. But enough talking for now, check out how it sounds!

Import Preset: Killer QueenImport Preset: Killer Queen

AmpStamp 1.5 Presets

Welcome to AmpStamp 1.5! From proto punk and college rock, to rockabilly and psychedelia, we think you’re going to find endless inspiration from playing and tinkering. Here are some new and revised presets, with better accuracy, and more control over your tone.

Import All 4 New PresetsImport All 4 New Presets

Import All 2 Revised PresetsImport All 2 Revised Presets


Raw Power

Proto punks. The godfathers of punk. The Stooges. We stumbled upon James Williamson’s lacerating tone from Raw Power, and we think you’ll agree, this tone cuts like a knife. Harnessing the unique sound of mixing elements of Vox and Marshall gear, Williamson found the perfect match to Iggy’s intense delivery. The only requirement is that you play it loud.

Import Raw PowerImport Raw Power


Monster

By the time R.E.M. recorded their album Monster, they were looking for a new sound. Something harder, rockier, and faster paced. Guitarist Peter Buck found that in a small 2×12 combo known for its grit and particular voicing for guitar. Armed with only that amplifier, Buck would record instant classics, making use of the raw tone of the amplifier at full volume, as well as the novel vibrato channel.

Import MonsterImport Monster


Slapback

Take a second to play this slapback tape delay and relive some of the finest moments recorded at Sun Studio. From Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis, to Johnny Cash, there’s a reason why musicians were clamoring for this new sound. Take what you can from it, and reinvent rock n’ roll once again.

Import SlapbackImport Slapback


Sunshine

While recording their album Disraeli Gears, Cream, and specifically Eric Clapton, would truly push what a guitar could do in pop music. Taking cues from seasoned blues players, Clapton effortlessly weaved inspired lead lines into simple song structures that served as platforms for improvisation during their live shows. But what was even more interesting was that sound he was putting to tape. A guitar had never quite sounded like that, and hasn’t since, until now.

Import SunshineImport Sunshine


Nellcôte II

Locked away from the rest of the world, living in hiding, living in excess. This was life for one of the most popular rock bands in history. Though the days may have blended into nights, interrupted by breakfast boats on the Italian Riviera, music happened. It needed to happen. It had to happen. And with a simple amplifier, a modest 2×12 combo, good times were rolling. Updated with speaker Color controls, for a darker, rounder tone, and Early Reflections to capture the sound of the studio.

Import Nellcôte IIImport Nellcôte II


Woodstock IV

Updated with a different amplifier and cabinet, and an improved, more accurate PH100 Phaser algorithm. As soon as you strike the first three notes of the Anthem, we think you’ll find that it can’t get any closer unless you happen to have the exact guitar that Hendrix used during performance. For the moment, this is one of rock’s all time greatest tones now available anywhere, anytime. Enjoy!

Import Woodstock IVImport Woodstock IV